Things have to change

Last Monday in my role as Chairman of the Improvement and Efficiency Panel of the East of England Local Government Association (EELGA) I chaired a conference at the Cambridge Genome Campus Conference Centre, probably the most impressive venue in East Anglia.  The conference was entitled Positive Ageing and co-convened by the Eastern Academic Health Science Network (EAHSN), which is an organisation within the Health system dedicated to new learning and bringing technology to the fore in the Health world, the other co-sponsors were NHS Confederation and Public Health England.

About 200 people from across the region’s Health and Social Care system gathered to hear speakers and life experiences of older age and how we, as a system, can help shape a positive vision and reality for people as they age in our communities.  An ageing population is often talked about but just living to a ripe of age is not enough it has to be a positive experience or what the point and that is the point I made in opening the Conference.

Here is conference brochure summary of what the day entailed:

‘With a significant ageing demographic the East of England is well positioned to be at the leading edge of accelerating the testing and scale up of self-care technology and health services in a way which can help make ageing work better for everyone.

This conference, led by Eastern AHSN, the East of England LGA, Public Health England and the NHS Confederation, will bring together NHS, local government, industry and academia stakeholders and aims to strengthen emerging solutions, new ways of working and shared plans for achieving healthier and happier ageing across the region.

In particular it will look to:

  • support the STPs to meet their ambitions on this agenda
  • identify opportunities to work collaboratively to further positive ageing agenda
  • position the region at the forefront of the UKs research and innovation communities.

The conference will be structured around six themes which include:

  • Defining successful ageing – What are the real demographics of ageing?
  • Sowing health habits – What can we do to ensure our own health and increase the chance of both a long life and a healthy life?
  • Rethinking work – How can society ensure the health and economic benefits of work for more people into older life?
  • Breakthroughs in technology – How can new research and innovations radically change our concepts of what old age means?
  • Connecting with others – How can we develop caring communities and multi-generational social networks?
  • Preserving purpose – How can health and social care systems focus on maintaining quality and purpose of life above the drive for extending life?’

And here is the link to the presentations from the day and if you have a look please look out for the Buurtzorg Health Care Model as that is a programme I am championing here in Suffolk and is a part of our contribution to the national debate about how we re-shape the healthcare system to better serve the changing age profile of our communities.

http://www.eelga.gov.uk/events/east_of_england_positive_ageing/

 

 

 

Independent Remuneration Panel

Every 4 years any Council is required to appoint an Independent Remuneration Panel to look at and report on the Allowance scheme for members of that particular Council.

So, last year we asked the monitoring officer of the Council to put together an independent panel to undertake the work.  The panel is unpaid and seeks to balance the need to make sure the scheme reflects the work undertaken with the need to keep costs down.

4 year ago the previous panel recommended work be undertaken before the next panel to look at various roles and to provide job descriptions to the next panel.  So, a year ago we asked the Audit Committee of the Council to draw up job descriptions for all the different roles Councillors undertake.  When the new panel formed last September, we asked that they be asked to take time to interview as many Councillors as possible.  We also asked that they reflect our scheme in the context of the schemes and levels of allowances from Upper Tier Councils across the East of England, which they have done.

The panel is made up of Sandra Cox who chaired the Panel and is a local government expert, Dame Lin Homer who has had a long career in Local and National Government roles, Mark Pendlington a Director of Anglian Water and Chairman of the NALEP and Andy Wood CE of Adnams.  So, by any one’s measure an expert panel who are all recognised as leaders of industry with years of experience in making tough decisions in large organisations.  The panel met 7 times between November 2016 and June 2017 to fully consider the scheme which will apply for the next four years.

We did ask them to consider the age and profile of the Councillors, as this is a concern to us all and how we could increase the number of women, younger people, and BME representatives of our community to better reflect our population.  In essense should the allowance scheme be increased to attract more diversity in the Chamber because people can’t afford to do it but they felt that in these difficult times that must be achieved by other means.

The Panel is recommending no change to the level of basic allowance county councillors receive but is suggesting an increase to the level of allowance for the roles of Leader, Deputy Leader and Cabinet by raising the way this is calculated which is by a multiplication of the basic allowance so Leader – from 2.5 to 3, Deputy – from 1.75 to 2, Cabinet – from 1.5 to 1.75.  These recommendations put Suffolk County Council in line with other county councils.

They have looked thoroughly at all aspects of the allowance scheme and make a number of recommendations that seek to remove outdated payments (breakfast/lunch etc.).  They also felt that in comparison to other Councils we now have too many Committees and so have recommended mergers of some with the removal of two Committee Chairman and less Members with Special Responsibility which we have reflected in the number that have been appointed to 4.  The overall effect of the proposals is cost neutral and that means they will not cost the Council tax payers of Suffolk any more money.

So these recommendations offer a revised allowance scheme with no additional burden to local tax payers.  The proposals will come before the Full Council next Thursday 20th July.

I believe there is little point asking an independent Panel to look at a scheme if you do not accept their findings and I believe it is fair and reasonable to accept their findings.

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